2015-09-26 / The Bullhorn

Bulldogs become DYW candidates

By Sara Coates
Bullhorn Report er


Roxboro Community School seniors who are participating in this year’s Distinguished Young Women of Roxboro program got together this week for a photo at school. The participants are, front row, from left, Breezy Castle, Ashley Forman, Mya Pettiford and Brittany Daye. Back row, from left, Ashton Martin, Claire Poindexter, Maria Carver, Stephanie DeVillier, Alycia Parker and Miranda Rice. (Not pictured, Maddie Keeton) 
Photo by Sara Coat es Roxboro Community School seniors who are participating in this year’s Distinguished Young Women of Roxboro program got together this week for a photo at school. The participants are, front row, from left, Breezy Castle, Ashley Forman, Mya Pettiford and Brittany Daye. Back row, from left, Ashton Martin, Claire Poindexter, Maria Carver, Stephanie DeVillier, Alycia Parker and Miranda Rice. (Not pictured, Maddie Keeton) Photo by Sara Coat es Roxboro Community School (RCS) is proud to have 11 of its seniors competing in the Distinguished Young Women (DYW) of Roxboro scholarship program this year.

The program will be held at the Kirby Theater in Uptown Roxboro today, Saturday, Sept. 26 and Sunday, Sept. 27.

The RCS participants are Breezy Castle, Claire Poindexter, Mya Pettiford, Stephanie DeVillier, Ashton Martin, Maddie Keeton, Ashley Foreman, Alycia Parker, Brittany Daye, Maria Carver and Miranda Rice.

When these participants were asked why they wanted to take part in the DYW program, their responses varied.

Breezy Castle decided to take part in the program because she said she has watched it for several years and knew it was outside of her comfort zone, and she wanted to push herself. Castle said her favorite part was when the participants became so tired during practice that they began to talk out of their heads.

“The hardest part for me would have to be maintaining composure in the very strenuous fitness routine,” said Castle, “but I do not have any regrets. I am very thankful for the experience this program has given me.”

Castle said she was proud of how hard her committee, fellow contestants and she had worked to have a good program this year.

Like Castle, Claire Poindexter was influenced by previous DYW participants. She said former participants told her their experience was exciting, and that they became close to the other girls. Poindexter hopes to know herself better and grow closer to the other girls involved.

“The opening and closing routines are the best part of practice because no one is being judged during this part and it focuses on us having a good time on stage,” said Poindexter.

Poindexter said she loved learning more about every girl’s likes, talents, and personalities, but she knew it would be hard to be on stage alone.

Unlike Castle and Poindexter, Mya Pettiford got involved with DYW because girls she looks up to participated in the past and motivated her to give it a try. She said she hopes that DYW will enhance her public speaking skills.

Pettiford said her favorite part has been being able to be herself throughout the program, but the hardest part for Pettiford has been, “smiling throughout fitness and elaborating during mock interviews.”

Pettiford said she regrets not taking advanced classes throughout high school, since grades are a big part of DYW.

Stephanie DeVillier said she grew up watching the DYW program just as Castle did, and had been waiting for her turn to participate.

DeVillier said she hopes this program helps her get to know herself, along with allowing her to become a well- rounded young woman. She said she had already learned about herself and grown close to all of the girls over the past year.

“I don’t know what I’m going to do without them on Sundays after the show is over,” DeVillier said.

“The weekly inspirations at practices, which are normally quotes or little sayings that the contestants share at each practice to inspire ourselves and the other girls, has been my favorite part,” said DeVillier.

Pushing herself outside of her own comfort zone was Ashton Martin’s main goal.

Martin said she was proud of the confidence she took away from the program. She had no regrets besides not getting to know the other participants as well as she could have. She hoped to take new friends away from the experience and become a better dancer.

“I’m pretty hopeless in that area,” Martin said.

Martin said she was deathly afraid of messing up her flute solo or falling during her fitness routine.

“Honestly, I am most proud of coping with my own lack of grace,” concluded Martin.

The DYW program gives the girls experiences they can look back on and appreciate, which is what Maddie Keeton wanted to gain from it.

Keeton’s favorite moment was laughing with the girls as they learned the meaning of hard work.

“I have grown in confidence tremendously and that’s a great accomplishment for myself. I have also received the chance to grow closer with all of my 26 new sisters,” said Keeton.

Ashley Foreman decided to participate in DYW to give herself an opportunity to gain scholarships, as well as grow as an individual. Foreman hopes the program can help her make lifelong friends, as well as help her build her confidence. Like DeVillier, Foreman said her favorite part of the program had been sharing the inspirational quotes at snack time.

Foreman said that through the program she had found new strengths and weaknesses within herself and learned what she needs to improve upon.

“The hardest part about participating in the Distinguished Young Women program is staying confident in yourself. You are surrounded by so many beautiful, talented and intelligent girls and it is important to remember that you are just as beautiful, talented and intelligent. Sometimes there are girls that are better than you are in certain areas of the competition but you have to be proud of them and let that encourage you to work harder,” said Foreman.

Like most of the other participants who hoped to gain confidence from this program, Alycia Parker decided to participate strictly to gain more confidence.

Parker said she always heard adults talking about what a positive program it was and wanted to be a part of it. Parker said she hoped to gain friendships and she already has grown closer to people in the program who she usually wouldn’t talk to.

Parker said, “The hardest part is definitely fitness. Eight minutes of full out dancing and exercise is tiring.”

Like Martin, Brittany Daye, said she wanted to participate because she knew that she wanted to better herself and gain more confidence. She also stated that she wanted to push herself beyond failure and weaknesses. Daye said she also hoped to become more sociable after this program.

“The hardest part has been pushing myself even in the midst of embarrassment,” Daye continued. “There have been times where I wanted to give up, but I kept telling myself that I could do it.”

Daye said she regretted not getting to know as many people as she could, but her greatest fear was messing up on the fitness routine and not performing her monologue to the best of her ability.

Just like Castle and DeVillier, Maria Carver said she has known since she was a little girl that she wanted to be in DYW.

Carver said she hopes to build unbreakable relationships during the program and the confidence to know that she can do anything she sets her mind to.

“The hardest part for me so far, has been the fitness. Stamina wise, I’m fine, but the flexibility part is what I’m having trouble with. For example, I can’t do a heel stretch, I’ve been stretching and stuff, but I’ve never taken a dance class, so for me that’s a disadvantage,” said Carver.

Unlike the other girls, Miranda Rice was encouraged by her friends to participate, and she felt like she would regret not going for it in the future.

Rice said she felt that the girls have truly grown a lot closer during the program. “The hardest part for me has been trying to remember all the choreography and not giving up,” Rice said.

Rice said she was most proud of pushing herself through the program because it had been a wonderful experience.

All 11 of these young women said they have worked harder than imaginable over the past year.

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