2016-04-16 / The Bullhorn

RCS students go political

Carly Long
Bullhorn Report er


Six RCS students attended the Youth Legislative Assembly in early April, as members of the Leadership Team. Back, from left, are Kailey Oakley, Carly Long, Stephanie DeVillier, Ashton Martin and Grace Hardy; front, Daniel Taylor. Six RCS students attended the Youth Legislative Assembly in early April, as members of the Leadership Team. Back, from left, are Kailey Oakley, Carly Long, Stephanie DeVillier, Ashton Martin and Grace Hardy; front, Daniel Taylor. On April 1 through April 3, a group of students from Roxboro Community School (RCS) attended the Youth Legislative Assembly (YLA) in Raleigh.

YLA is a mock legislative program for high school students that allows them to participate in debating, voting and bill writing.

A select group of 28 students from all over North Carolina were chosen through an application and interview process to serve on the leadership team. Out of these, six were students from RCS. They have been working since August to organize the conference.

The tri-speakers, who acted as the student head of the assembly, were current seniors Ashton Martin and Daniel Taylor.

The third was RCS alumni and current NC School of Science and Math senior Emily Pierce.

There were 11 committees presenting bills at YLA, each having two co-chairs. Of these, three were from RCS.

Junior Kailey Oakley acted as chair for the Substance Abuse Committee. Her committee passed a bill to legalize the use of recreational and medical marijuana.

Junior Carly Long was chair for the Environment Committee, passing a bill to restore Jordan Lake from its current polluted state.

Sophomore Grace Hardy served as chair for the Civil Rights committee. Her group’s legislation was to limit the time a prisoner is allowed to be held in solitary confinement. All three bills passed when voted on by the approximately 200 student assembly.

Additionally, senior Stephanie DeVillier served as a clerk on the leadership team. She and four other high school girls worked as the backbone for the program. They put together folders for the delegates and gift bags for the adult consultants, and had many more ‘behind-the-scenes’ duties.

RCS English teacher Wanda Ball took 11 students as delegates. They were divided into committees by choice and spent the weekend listening to and debating bill topics. On Friday, each committee separated into private meeting spaces. There, the committee delegates voiced their opinions to the co-chairs in order to improve their bill. At the end of the meeting, each committee voted on an Outstanding Delegate. Dustin Humphries, a freshman at RCS, won the award for the judiciary committee.

“I was so honored to be recognized by my group as the hardest working delegate,” said Humphries.

Finally, after a speech and question-answer session, the assembly voted Carly Long to serve as one of the three tri-speakers for next year’s assembly along with two other rising seniors from varying North Carolina schools.

“I felt that our tri-speakers did a fabulous job, as did our co-chairs. Our delegates, even those attending for the first time, were active participants. Students returned with a greater appreciation for the legislative process,” said Ball.

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