2016-04-30 / The Bullhorn

The Metro isn’t that scary

By Jackson Woody
Bullhorn Report er


Members of the RCS communications class visited Washington, D.C. on April 14 and 15. After visiting monuments and the National Mall, the students spent time at the Newseum, studying history and trends in journalism. Members of the RCS communications class visited Washington, D.C. on April 14 and 15. After visiting monuments and the National Mall, the students spent time at the Newseum, studying history and trends in journalism. When you Google metro, you will probably find a definition. The definition is: a subway system within a city, especially Paris.

While we may have not been in Paris, that is what we found in Washington D.C., a metro. Personally, my definition is: a subway system that can go up to 65 miles per hour (in rush hour), that will turn, bump, stop suddenly, and scare a 14-year-old boy who has never been in a big city.

It terrified me.

How fast it moved, how easily one could fall onto the track, and bam, you’re dead. This is how many civilians get around Washington. Normal, everyday people. Working people. Patiently waiting for the next stop, waiting to get wherever they are going. People I most likely will never see again. That’s what fascinates me about the metro system; you see people once, maybe twice by chance, and will most likely never see them again, especially in a big city such as Washington.

Now back to my first time; it was horrifying. I was worried for others’ safety, as well as mine. Then, I realized something. People ride this. Every. Single. Day. A crazy thought. Why do people do this? Maybe insurance costs, car payments, traffic, or maybe even efficiency.

The thought baffled me.

Over the course of my two-day time in Washington, I became more accustomed to the system. I took four total rides on the metro, before realizing that I would not die every time I get on the metro. The system was thought out, obviously with safety in mind. Each metro is on a system. Screens in the metro station tell when each train arrive. There are plenty of maps to tell you where you will go, including signs showing which metro goes in which direction.

Citizens of Washington think of the metro as nothing more than a means of transportation, something they use every day. It was terrifying to me, but definitely a fun experience. One I will never forget, that is for sure.

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