2016-11-05 / The Bullhorn

RCS comes to aid of sister charter school

By Madison Fuller
Bullhorn Reporter


RCS students, staff and families recently collected and delivered water and pet food to a sister charter school affected by Hurricane Matthew flooding. From left, Bullhorn Editor Delaney Sullivan, SEA students Matt Cutbush, Ethan Driggers and Kasey Davis, and Bullhorn reporter Madison Fuller. RCS students, staff and families recently collected and delivered water and pet food to a sister charter school affected by Hurricane Matthew flooding. From left, Bullhorn Editor Delaney Sullivan, SEA students Matt Cutbush, Ethan Driggers and Kasey Davis, and Bullhorn reporter Madison Fuller. Roxboro Community School (RCS) students and faculty collected donations for a sister charter school affected by the flooding following Hurricane Matthew that affected North Carolina in early October.

For two weeks, RCS students and faculty gathered donations of water and pet food for Southeastern Academy Charter School (SEA). A special jeans day raised over $800 to purchase water, and a local business owner chipped in more money when he learned of the effort. Nearly 500 cases of water and around 20 bags of pet food were delivered to the students and staff at the school.

SEA is a K-8 charter school located in Lumberton with an enrollment of 210 students.

Principal Kristen Stone explained that the students are “motivated, creative, intelligent and kind.”

With Hurricane Matthew, a majority of the east coast of North Carolina was adversely affected. SEA had multiple leaks in the roof of the building due to the storm removing shingles. The SEA library and science classrooms had the most damage.

Four families of students at SEA lost everything in the flood waters.

Kasey Davis, Matt Cutbush and Ethan Driggers, all eighth graders at SEA, were among the students whose homes were damaged by the flood.

Davis has been at SEA for four years. She explained that the flood water damaged most of the things under her house.

“The flood waters got about four inches from my door,” said Davis. “Seeing all of this stuff happening to all our communities in Robeson County and seeing how it’s affecting everyone in town, is heartbreaking.”

Cutbush said his family had four cars before the flood and three of them were totaled by the water.

“The flood has made me a better person,” said Cutbush. “I’ve seen people in a state of depression.”

He added that he was grateful for the help received from RCS. “I’m just happy people are taking time out of their day to bring us supplies.”

Driggers described the devastation caused by the waters. The carpets and walls of his home are moldy now. Due to the damage, he is currently staying in a mobile home.

“It’s hard because I’m constantly worrying about what’s going to happen later rather than what’s happening right now,” explained Driggers. “I’m trying to set an example for my brother, who is five years younger than me. I’m trying to keep him from panicking.”

Driggers said his house probably won’t be repaired until December.

“I’ve noticed the flood has really brought out the best and the worst in people,” said Driggers. “People are constantly helping; it’s awesome.”

Carrie Hawkins, RCS’s registrar and testing coordinator, was one of the people among the RCS students and faculty who visited SEA.

She conveyed her pride and love for RCS, saying, “I am so proud of our Bulldog family for all the efforts in providing for our sister charter school. It teaches our students so many valuable lessons, most importantly the willingness to help others in need.”

“RCS went above and beyond the call of duty,” said SEA Principal Stone. “It warms our hearts to know that people who don’t even know us were so giving and caring to our families at SEA.”

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