2018-11-07 / Features

Habitat becomes a family affair

BY JOHNNY WHITFIELD
COURIER-TIMES EDITOR


Volunteers guide a roof truss into place at a Habitat House on Burch Avenue. PHOTOS BY JOHNNY WHITFIELD | COURIER-TIMES Volunteers guide a roof truss into place at a Habitat House on Burch Avenue. PHOTOS BY JOHNNY WHITFIELD | COURIER-TIMES Nearly a quarter century after they first gathered to remember family members with the construction of a Habitat House, Roxboro’s Winstead family was back at it again this year.

On Saturday, children and grandchildren of the eight offspring of Samuel Garland Winstead and Kate Barden Winstead gathered with other Habitat for Humanity volunteers at a construction site on Burch Avenue where the foundation of a new home had been poured.

By days end the four walls of the home had been erected, the framework for the roof was up and several rooms inside the house had been framed in.

It was a long day of work, but for the person who will move into the home, Rondetta Morris, the dream of home ownership now seems a little more real.

“I’m really grateful because they don’t know me from anything. They are taking their time to help make my life better. You have to really love it in your heart to do this,” Morris said.


Bill Cooke, left, Don Ward and Barden Cooke look over a floor plan for the Habitat House they worked on Saturday. Bill Cooke, left, Don Ward and Barden Cooke look over a floor plan for the Habitat House they worked on Saturday. The Winstead family is officially considered the sponsor for the project. That means they needed to raise $50,000 toward the construction of the home. Family member Bill Cooke, a former state president of Habitat for Humanity, said the family was able to raise $56,000 to help support construction of the home and other Habitat work.

Cooke says the Habitat project is a great way to bring his large family together. “When we helped with the first house in 1994, we sort of made it into a family reunion,” Cooke said. That’s what the family did again this year. After working all day on Saturday, the clan cleaned up and gathered at Long Memorial United Methodist Church for a dinner and a more formal reunion.


Fletcher Tate reads scripture during a dedication ceremony at Roxboro’s newest Habitat House on Saturday. Fletcher Tate reads scripture during a dedication ceremony at Roxboro’s newest Habitat House on Saturday. But not before taking the time to formally dedicate the project.

Barden Winstead addressed some of the commonalities his father and aunts and uncles shared, including service to others, winning, but winning properly and making an impact on others.

“These eight siblings were devoted to their parents and they were devoted to each other,” Winstead said.

The siblings include Sam Garland Winstead, Jr., Sam Byrd Winstead, Katherine Winstead Craven, Suzanne Winstead Wilson, Ida Winstead Taylor, Fletcher Merritt Winstead, Barden Winstead and Eleanor Winstead Cooke.



Winstead family members chat prior to the start of a dedication ceremony. Winstead family members chat prior to the start of a dedication ceremony.


Volunteers erected exterior walls and framed in rooms for a new Habitat House. Volunteers erected exterior walls and framed in rooms for a new Habitat House.

Rondetta Morris thanks Winstead family members for their work on her new home. Rondetta Morris thanks Winstead family members for their work on her new home.

Return to top